News Articles

BNAC's Commitment to Information Security: Our ISO 27k Certification

Tuesday, February 13th, 2024

At the Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center (BNAC), we take the security and privacy of data very seriously. We are proud to hold the ISO 27001 certification, a testament to our unwavering commitment to the highest standards of information security and data protection. This prestigious certification is complemented by our ISO 9001:2015 certification, which covers our overall quality system, showcasing our comprehensive approach to excellence in all operational facets.

BNAC in the Spotlight at ECTRIMS 2023

Wednesday, January 3rd, 2024

The Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center (BNAC) enjoyed the spotlight at the recent European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ECTRIMS) 2023 where its researchers were recognized for an unprecedented array of publications that are shaping the field of neuroimaging in multiple sclerosis (pwMS) and related disorders.

Advancements and Challenges in Multiple Sclerosis: A Comprehensive Review in Lancet

Monday, November 27th, 2023

Recent advancements in multiple sclerosis (MS) research, including improved diagnostic criteria and novel MRI techniques, have been highlighted in a new Lancet paper by researchers from the Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center (BNAC) and the Jacobs MS Center for Treatment and Research.

BNAC Celebrates New Headquarters at Grand Opening

Wednesday, November 1st, 2023

On October 5th Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center celebrated the opening of its new headquarters located at the University at Buffalo's Downtown Gateway Building.

Grand Opening of BNACs New Offices

Wednesday, September 6th, 2023

Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center presents the Grand Opening of our New Offices on October 5th, 2023.

MRI Scanner Launches New Biomedical Imaging Era at UB

Friday, September 1st, 2023

The massive 5.5-ton Philips MR 7700 that was installed in June in the Center for Biomedical Imaging (CBI) in UB’s Clinical and Translational Research Center (CTRC) is now operational.

BNAC Summer 2023 Newsletter

Monday, July 31st, 2023

Links Between Eye Measurements and Brain Function in People with Multiple Sclerosis Point to Possible Biomarker for Cognitive Performance

Thursday, July 6th, 2023

Retinal nerve fiber thickness may serve as a potential biomarker for cognitive impairment in people with MS, possibly predicting future cognitive decline.

BNAC Director Robert Zivadinov Wins Highest Faculty Honor as SUNY Distinguished Professor

Tuesday, May 23rd, 2023

Robert Zivadinov, MD, Ph.D., has been named a SUNY Distinguished Professor – the highest faculty honor in the State University of New York (SUNY) system.

Novel MRI Technique Predicts Staging of Paramagnetic Rim Lesions

Monday, March 13th, 2023

BNAC researchers develop a novel MRI technique that predicts staging of Paramagnetic Rim Lesions, a biomarker of chronic brain inflammation believed to be associated with progressive MS. They presented their work at ACTRIMS Forum 2023.

2022 Annual BNAC Newsletter

Thursday, December 22nd, 2022

Each year, we share highlights of our patient-centered research, news about our scientists, core laboratory services, and our many collaborations at the Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center. Thank you for taking an interest in our work. As always, we welcome your inquiries, comments, and suggestions and invite you to stay in touch with our progress on the developments that matter most to you.

Robert Zivadinov, MD, PhD, is honored as a recipient of the 2022 State University of New York Chancellor’s Awards for Excellence in Scholarship and Creative Activities

Tuesday, July 5th, 2022

Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center (BNAC) director and University at Buffalo Professor of Neurology Robert Zivadinov, MD, PhD, is among six UB faculty honored as recipients of the 2022 State University of New York Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Scholarship and Creative Activities. The SUNY system-wide Chancellor’s Awards recognize “consistently superior professional achievement and the ongoing pursuit of excellence” and the award for Excellence in Scholarship and Creative Activities specifically recognizes “those who engage actively in scholarly and creative pursuits beyond their teaching responsibilities.” 

AIMING NEW IMAGING METHODS AT A POTENTIALLY PROMISING THERAPEUTIC TARGET: MICROGLIA ACTIVATION

Thursday, June 30th, 2022

Initiating MS Research Breakthroughs While Building on Consensus

In a recent University at Buffalo’s Department of Neurology “Grand Rounds” presentation to research colleagues, doctoral candidates, and other students, BNAC Director Robert Zivadinov, MD, PhD, provided a comprehensive discussion of how a combination of traditional and novel imaging methods open the door wider to targeting microglia activation as a viable MS therapy. New imaging methods used in the study make it possible or easier to reliably assess microglia activation in living patients in addition to guiding pharmaceutical companies developing new microglia-focused MS treatments.

Zivadinov and his BNAC colleagues are delivering therapy-accelerating imaging of microglia activation, a long-trusted but hard-to-measure biomarker for secondary-progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS). Currently it is not possible to predict who will eventually develop SPMS in which lost or damaged nerves worsen MS symptoms.

VIDEO: First Head-to-head comparison of FDA-approved DMTs using four imaging modalities is explained by Robert Zivadinov, MD, PhD

Wednesday, June 1st, 2022

The first head-to-head comparison using microglia imaging of two FDA-approved disease-modifying treatments (DMTs) for multiple sclerosis is underway. Watch Center Director Robert Zivadinov, MD, PhD explain a study underway at the Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center (BNAC) on NeurologyLive®.

Robert Zivadinov, MD PhD, Looks at Brain Atrophy in MS on a Sanofi Genzyme Podcast

Thursday, April 7th, 2022

Brain atrophy is one of the most destructive consequences of Multiple Sclerosis. In this recent episode of the “The MS Podcast” presented by Sanofi Genzyme, BNAC Center Director Robert Zivadinov, MD, PhD, takes a closer look at brain atrophy and other brain measures in explaining physical disability with MS.

Robert Zivadinov, MD, PhD, Discusses DeepGRAI Registry Study at 2022 AAN

Monday, April 4th, 2022

In an interview by NeurologyLive® from the American Academy of Neurology Annual Meeting, BNAC Center Director Robert Zivadinov, MD, PhD, explains the significance of the DeepGRAI registry study. The study applied an Artificial Intelligence algorithm developed by BNAC’s Michael Dwyer, Ph.D., to analyze routine, clinical MRI (T2FLAIR) scans taken in 30-35 different centers of approximately 1,000 people with MS. The use of AI on widely-available MRI scans reliably measured thalamic volume—an established marker for disease progression including disability and declining cognition in people with MS.

In the interview, now available on NeurologyLive®, Zivadinov notes that, “This is important because… it is now possible to have this done on every clinical patient. It clearly gives providers a tool to better measure what's happening from a gray matter point of view.”

The AI tool is named DeepGRAI—Deep Gray Rating via Artificial Intelligence—for its use of imperfect information to generate reliable measurements, is now available to clinicians.

 

Understanding MS Research Endpoints Helps Providers and Payers Improve Outcomes Using DMTs

Tuesday, March 1st, 2022

BNAC Director Robert Zivadinov, MD, PhD, is lead author of “Population Health Guide to the Evolution of Endpoints in Multiple Sclerosis.” The AJMC-published whitepaper, sponsored by Janssen Pharmaceuticals, addresses the challenge to formulary and clinical decision makers in comparing the efficacy of disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) for people with Multiple Sclerosis.

Zivadinov, along with Michael J. Fine, MDKrishna R. Patel, PharmD, RPh, and Neil Minkoff, MD, have provided a framework for providers and payers to better understand the methodologies employed in clinical trials on the increasing number of MS DMTs.

Robert Zivadinov, MD PhD, Discusses What MRI Tells Us About EBV in MS on a Sanofi Genzyme Podcast

Monday, February 28th, 2022

The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a member of the herpes virus family and one of the most common human viruses found all over the world. In this recent episode of the “The MS Podcast” presented by Sanofi Genzyme, BNAC Center Director Robert Zivadinov, MD, PhD, takes a closer look at the role of EBV in MS and its association with brain MRI images.

2021 BNAC Newsletter

Tuesday, January 18th, 2022

Thank you for taking an interest in the patient-centered research, the scientists, the core laboratory services, and the mission of the Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center. It’s a pleasure to share highlights from 2021 and invite you to stay in touch with our progress on the developments that matter most to you. We hope you find this 2021 Newsletter informative and welcome your comments and suggestions. 

BNAC Study and Novel Software Show Uncommon Insight About MS Progression from Common MRI Scans

Thursday, December 2nd, 2021

There is no commonly-available way for clinical neurologists to use an “everyday” MRI to provide their multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with meaningful news about their disease progression, including brain tissue changes associated with physical and cognitive impairment. The reason? Conventional MRI methods in the vast majority of clinical settings are inadequate in creating scans that can be used to measure two of the most reliable known “markers” of MS progression. 

In August of this year, though, BNAC researchers published their NeuroSTREAM MSBase study. The study demonstrated that neurologists using a new, open-source software—NeuroSTREAM, recently co-developed by BNAC scientists—along with the widely-available T2-FLAIR MRI protocol, can perform and read scans that confidently assess reliable and clinically meaningful proxies of the two critical markers—salient central brain lesion volume (SCLV) and lateral ventricle volume (LVV)—in regular clinical routine settings and even in the face of complete scanner changes.